Safety Pays. Falls Cost.

Stand-Down: Getting Started

The National Safety Stand-Down may be over, but the suggested activities in this day-by-day plan for the week can still be used year-round to educate workers and help prevent falls.

The National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about fall hazards, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies, goals and expectations.  This day-by-day plan for the Stand-Down is divided into activities that only take 15-30 minutes a day, and can be tailored to your jobsite.  Each suggestion listed, along with others you will find on stopconstructionfalls.com, can be used any day of the week.  While not all employers can commit to an activity all 5 days, everyone can do something to have an impact on safety!

Read about successful Stand-Down activities and tell us about your own here.

Day 1: Monday, June 2

Give a Toolbox Talk! Toolbox Talks are short and easy on-site trainings that only last approximately 5-15 minutes each.  They can be given at the beginning of the shift.  Workers attending the talk should be encouraged to ask questions and discuss the topic. This increases the likelihood they will remember the information.  Below are some ready-to-use Toolbox Talks from CPWR.  Toolbox Talks on a second topic can also be substituted for another activity later in the week.

Possible Toolbox Talks:

Tips for Trainers:

  1. Print the Toolbox Talks above double-sided, or paste the pages together back-to-back.  This way, while you conduct the Toolbox Talk, workers in front of you will see a photo demonstrating the safe work practice.
  2. Spend approximately 15 minutes before giving the talk to familiarize yourself with the material.  Think about how the topic relates to your jobsite.
  3. Ask questions instead of simply giving them the information. After you ask a question, wait a short time to let people think. Then, ask volunteers to answer.
  4. Use examples.  Provide your own examples and/or ask workers about their personal experience. This can help the group see how the topic is relevant to them. You could ask: Has anyone here fallen off a ladder? What happened?
  5. Make sure everyone has a chance to talk. If a crew member is talking too much, invite someone else to speak.
  6. Never make fun of anyone or put anyone down, especially for asking questions.
  7. If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t guess. Write the question down and promise to get back to them.

Day 2: Tuesday, June 3

Watch videos with your crew! CPWR has two short videos on falls that can be streamed or downloaded to play without an internet connection.  Before the work shift or during breaks, videos can be viewed as a group.

A Simple Task – Fatal Ladder Fall

This 2 minute video using photos and animation recreates the real-life series of events that led to the death of a 33-year-old construction worker from a ladder fall — and how it could have been prevented.

Download Video (right click & save)
View on YouTube

Don’t Fall For It. 2006. For an injury prevention campaign, this 13 minute video mixes interviews with survivors of falls from ladders (or victims’ survivors) with information about safe procedures. Accompanying worker tip sheets are also available in English and Spanish.

English version

Spanish version

 Tips for Trainers:

  1. Familiarize yourself with the video prior to sharing it with your crew.
  2. After watching the video, ask questions and discuss how the events of the video relate to your site.  After you ask a question, wait a short time to let people think. Then, ask volunteers to answer.
  3. Make sure everyone has a chance to talk. If a crew member is talking too much, invite someone else to speak.
  4. Never make fun of anyone or put anyone down, especially for asking questions.
  5. If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t guess. Write the question down and promise to get back to them.

Day 3: Wednesday, June 4

Pass out and review Hazard Alert Cards! Hazard Alerts are short, image-driven materials that deliver simple, direct messages for protection against safety and health hazards faced by construction workers. They are available in two formats: CPWR printed cards folded to “pocket size” of 3 ½” x 5 ½” and one-page PDFs.  CPWR printed cards are water-resistant and built to last.

Plan on giving a card or print-out to each worker and then review it together as a group at the beginning of the shift.  Like the Toolbox Talks, it is best to encourage workers to ask questions and engage in discussion to increase the likelihood that everyone will remember the information shared.

To order printed cards, email csinyai@cpwr.com or call 301-495-8544.

To download one page PDFs, click here:

Ladders Hazard Alert

Scaffolds Hazard Alert

 Day 4: Thursday, June 5

Use the NIOSH Ladder Safety phone app with your crew!  The app features a graphic-oriented guide for ladder selection, inspection, positioning, accessorizing, and safe use.  The app is also available in Spanish (to view and use, select Spanish as the phone language).

 

Download on iPhone/iPad 

Download on Android devices

The Ladder Safety App User’s Manual is also available:

iOS    (En español)

Android    (En español)

Tips for Trainers:

  1. Download and familiarize yourself with the app prior to sharing it with your crew.
  2. Ask a few others on site (e.g. supervisors, foremen, or workers) to download the app if possible so that smaller groups can practice using it together.
  3. Review the app features together as a group and then ask the smaller groups to play with the app or practice using it on site together.
  4. Give workers the opportunity to ask questions about its use. If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t guess. Write the question down and promise to get back to them.

 Day 5: Friday, June 6

Inspect your equipment!

The American Ladder Institute provides a Ladder Inspection Checklist that covers step ladders, extension ladders, and combination ladders.

Stopconstructionfalls.com provides a checklist to make sure that your Personal Fall Arrest Harness is functioning properly.

 Hand out hardhat stickers for participation! OSHA has developed stickers to help raise awareness of the Campaign to Prevent Falls in Construction. These stickers can be affixed onto equipment on a work site, to spread the word: Safety Pays. Falls Cost.

To order these or any of OSHA’s outreach materials, call OSHA’s Office of Communications at (202) 693-1999 or visit OSHA’s Publications page.  If you are in a State Plan State, you may also be eligible for cost-free resources.  Find out more information here.

 For even more ideas on how to participate in the Stand Down, or to improve your fall prevention efforts year round, visit the rest of stopconstructionfalls.com, or check out NIOSH and OSHA’s sites.